Sweet & Tangy Southern Coleslaw (Vegan & Plant Paradox-friendly)


Ahh, BBQ month is coming into full swing. And what would any tri-sectioned, styrofoam plate be without a side of coleslaw?

I know barbecue is supposedly “all about the meat,” but I think that pulled pork or brisket would be nothin’ without its trusty sidekicks.

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Barbecue culture is near and dear to my heart because its this cuisine that originally sparked my desire to cook back when I was a wee ‘lil one (about fifth grade, to be exact). Unlike other cuisines, barbecue struck as me being all about soul. When it was plated, it always seemed unassuming, but the moment you took a bite, the hours, love, and spirit that went into the food are sensed by each tastebud, creating an explosion of flavor. Of course technique is important to any cuisine, but barbecue also places importance on community, good times, and soul.

While it’s kind of our job to make specific recipes so that you guys can recreate them with similar results, it seems like every time we make a barbecue meal, we change it up – throwing in a little bit more of this, adding this instead of that, and… well, you get my point: BBQ is not a science. 

Interestingly, even though they contain heaps of flavor, most barbecue dishes are extremely simple. Take coleslaw for example – it’s essentially a Southern twist on a salad with vinaigrette. Vinaigrettes typically contain three parts oil and one part vinegar. In coleslaw, mayonnaise – which is almost entirely oil – forms the base of the dressing, then a splash of vinegar, touch of salt, pepper, and sugar complete it. While the ratio of oil to vinegar here is 8:1 (this is the South we’re talking about after all), it’s basically a simple vinaigrette. Then, cabbage and carrots take the place of leafy greens, which makes sense because these vegetables are more economical to grow – that’s important because barbecue was originally created by slaves. Albeit, barbecue’s slave history will have to wait for another post (don’t worry, I won’t keep you waiting for too long).

Just like the small amount of ingredients, coleslaw only takes a small amount of steps to make. All you do is thinly shred cabbage, grate some carrot, whisk together your dressing, toss it all together, and refrigerate it for 30 minutes. 

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“Huh? What’s that? You say that the people may be intimidated by shredding cabbage? They think they need to have 3 years of professional knife experience to get it done? Okay, I’ll let the people know.”

It’s true – shredding cabbage has an intimidating appearance to it. But it’s truthfully a simple procedure. To accomplish it, you remove any tough outer leaves, then cut the head straight down the middle using a large chef’s knife, thus cutting through the root. Place each half cut-side down and cut in half again, still slicing through root. Face one of the quarter’s cut-side down and make a diagonal cut through the center, thus cutting out the core – by removing its core, the cabbage will fall part in separate pieces as you cut it. Now, take your knife and cut from the top (rounded part) of the cabbage straight down to the cutting board. Ideally, slice off roughly 1/8 inch each time, which will create the perfect consistency for coleslaw. Make the same cuts all the way through until you no longer have enough room to cut. Then flip the end piece on its side and thinly shred that as well.

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There you have, thinly shredded cabbage! This technique is great for coleslaw, stir-fries, and more. If you’re a visual learner, this video showcases how to shred cabbage in a similar fashion to how we do it! Albeit, this person shreds it on a bias while we shred it with the knife parallel to the cabbage.

All in all, this coleslaw is our Plant Paradox-friendly & Vegan take on the Southern-style slaw that I grew up with. It’s:

  • Crunchy, creamy, & rich
  • Lightly sweet, subtly tangy, and full-bodied 
  • Easy to make as it requires only 1 bowl and 10 minutes of prep time
  • Vegan, lectin-free, & sugar-free
  • Rich in antioxidants and Oleic Acids (Omega-9 fatty acids)

We hope you enjoy the first side dish of our barbecue extravaganza. If you haven’t yet, subscribe to our email list to be the first to know about upcoming recipes! In upcoming posts, we’ll be diving further into barbecue’s rich culture as well as showing you guys the best, vegan barbecue recipes out there.

See you next time!
Ryan

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Sweet & Tangy Southern Coleslaw (Vegan & Plant Paradox-friendly)

  • Servings: 4 side servings
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Print

Thinly shredded cabbage and grated carrot tossed in rich & creamy, vinegary sweet dressing. A classic dish made vegan & lectin-free.

Ingredients

  • 2 1/2 c thinly shredded green cabbage (about 1/4 of a head)
  • 3/4 c thinly shredded red cabbage
  • 1/4 c grated carrot (about 1 medium carrot)
  • 1/2 c vegan avocado oil mayonnaise
  • 1 tbsp vinegar (rice, wine, or distilled vinegar all work)
  • 1 tbsp confectioner’s Swerve (or 2 tbsp erythritol)
  • pinch of salt
  • pinch of black pepper

Directions

  1. If you’re unsure how to thinly shred cabbage, check out the notes for directions! To ensure proper measuring, pack the cabbage & carrot down tight to remove most of their air before reading the measurements.
  2. In a large mixing bowl, whisk together mayonnaise, vinegar, Swerve, a large pinch of salt, and a small pinch of black pepper.
  3. Fold in cabbage and carrots into dressing until completely coated. Cover bowl with plastic wrap and place in fridge to marinate for at least 30 minutes.
  4. Enjoy after 30 minutes or store in fridge for up to two days! Enjoy alongside barbecue jackfruit, baked beans, or Texas toast.

*How to Shred Cabbage: Watch this 2 minute video OR remove any tough, outer leaves. Then, take a large chef’s knife and cut the head straight down the middle, thus cutting through the root. Place each half flat-side down and cut in half again, still slicing through root. Face a quarter cut-side down and make a diagonal cut through the cabbage, thus cutting out the core. Now, cut from the top (rounded part) of the cabbage straight down to the cutting board. Ideally, slice off roughly 1/8 inch each time, which will create the perfect, thinly shredded consistency. Make the same cuts all the way until you no longer have enough to cut, then flip the end piece on its side, and thinly shred that as well.

*If you don’t feel like buying an entire red cabbage just to use less 1/8th of it, you can use all green cabbage! The colors won’t be there, but it’ll taste the same.

 

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